Posts by Andy Fuqua

Servant of God, husband, dad, pastor, lifelong student, aspiring theologian, musician, angler-wannabe. I love roasting coffee beans, playing jazz, fly fishing, and studying God’s Word.

Rebuke the Wise

“Whoever corrects a mocker invites insults; whoever rebukes the wicked incurs abuse. Do not rebuke mockers or they will hate you; rebuke the wise and they will love you. Instruct the wise and they will be wiser still; teach the righteous and they will add to their learning.” (Proverbs 9:7-9, NIV)

One of the most difficult things for me, personally, is bringing a challenge to a person. I don’t find it terribly hard to challenge a congregation through a sermon to come into alignment with God’s Word, to turn from sin, or to change the way they think or believe. But when it comes to meeting with someone personally, bringing a rebuke is not easy!

Yet, that is something we are called to do as brothers and sisters in Christ. We should love each other enough to bring correction when needed. And, we should be humble when we receive a rebuke. When I read these verses in Proverbs 9, I found myself asking, Am I more like the mocker or the wise person? When someone brings you a challenge, do you respond with defensiveness? Do you go into self-preservation mode? Or do you humble yourself, hear the rebuke, and grow wiser as a result?

I will confess that defensiveness is often my default reaction, but I am learning to put my self-preservation aside and hear the rebuke. Usually, there is something in it I can grow from. Of course, occasionally a challenge is brought that is entirely worthless, and not offered in an “I want to help you grow” spirit, but in an “I want to tear you down” attitude. When that happens, it’s best to turn the other cheek and forget the rebuke altogether as I remember whose I am–I am His, and nothing will change that!

I have found over the years that to avoid bringing a challenge rarely helps a person. As difficult as it can be to give a rebuke, sometimes that’s precisely what’s needed to help them mature and grow. But when you do offer a word of constructive criticism, it’s best to do it with an attitude of grace, in a spirit of humility and encouragement. The goal is never to merely challenge a person and walk away; it’s to bring both challenge and support, both rebuke and encouragement, both correction and accountability. Because at the end of the day, our goal should be to see the other person grow closer to the Lord.

One of the best and simplest tools out there to help think through challenge and support is The Support-Challenge Matrix from GiANT World Wide Leadership.

My prayer for this week is that you will have the courage to bring a challenge if it’s needed in the next seven days. Or, the humility to receive a rebuke and allow the Holy Spirit to use it as a catalyst for growth in your life.

 

The Highest Point Along the Way

“Listen, for I have trustworthy things to say; I open my lips to speak what is right. My mouth speaks what is true, for my lips detest wickedness.” (Proverbs 8:6-7, NIV)

This chapter in Proverbs personifies Wisdom. She goes to “the highest point along the way, where the paths meet… beside the gate leading into the city” (vv. 2-3) and calls out, inviting people to come and learn wisdom and righteousness. At the beginning of her speech, she says verses 6-7 above.

Talk about a challenge! Do these verses describe you? Can people trust what I say, or do I tend to exaggerate too much? Is my word unreliable? Do I spin things to look more positive (or more negative) than they actually are? Is my speech right and true? Do my lips detest wickedness?

I think it becomes even more of a challenge when we consider communication beyond just our speech. In particular, I’m thinking of Facebook, SnapChat, Instagram, email, etc. In today’s world, social media is the highest point along the way, where the paths meet. Yet, when we get on Facebook, Twitter, or other sites, how often do we think intentionally about what we say on those platforms? When we’re fired up and typing an email, do we remember how much easier it is to be snarky through a message than when we’re face-to-face?

Jesus said, “The mouth speaks what the heart is full of” (Luke 6:45). I think it would be consistent with His teaching to say a person’s Facebook page reflects what their heart is full of. Think about what you say, and look through your Facebook wall in light of Proverbs 8:6-7. What kinds of pictures do you post to Instagram? What does your SnapChat communicate about the kind of person you are? My prayer for this week is that all of us will think before we speak or post. Is this wise? Is it trustworthy? Is it right? Is it true? Does it represent Christ well?

 

Here’s My Heart, Lord

“Do not let your heart turn to her ways or stray into her paths.” (Proverbs 7:25, NIV)

Does God have your heart? Or does your heart wander? Does your heart stray? The key to victory over sin is not hating sin–let’s be honest, sometimes we don’t hate sin! Sometimes the reason why it’s hard to leave sin is that we like it… sometimes we even love it. But as much as our fallen human natures love the darkness, we can overcome sin with love for God. We may at times love our sin, but we love Jesus more.

Love is stronger than fear or duty. I may give God my will to do what is right, but unless I give Him my heart, it’s short-lived. Love endures when the will falters. Love compels when fatigue sets in. Love drives on when duty fades away. That’s why worship is so vital to the Christian life! It is in and through worship that we give our hearts to God, and when He has our hearts, He has all of us. This morning I was deeply moved by this verse and the song below. My prayer for the week is that you will make this song your anthem, and in so doing will find yourself more deeply in love with our Lord than ever before.


Photo above by Jamez Picard on Unsplash

The Door of Her House

“Keep to a path far from her, do not go near the door of her house…” (Proverbs 5:8, NIV).

Are you strong enough to resist sin? Be careful before you answer! Proverbs 5 is a lesson Solomon taught his son about avoiding an adulterous woman. One of the most intriguing things about his instruction is that he doesn’t encourage his son to resist the woman. Instead, he says to stay far away from her.

I think this principle applies universally. Many times in my life I have prayed for the strength to resist temptation. But the Lord has reminded me time and again that wisdom is better than strength. When we think we’re strong, we’re in great danger! Rather than taking pride in our strength to resist, it’s far better to admit our weakness and avoid the temptation altogether.

If I avoid the opportunity to sin, I avoid the sin (whatever sin it may be). Maybe I could withstand the temptation and remain faithful, but why risk it? In seminary, I remember reading about a pastor who went into a strip club to meet with one of the strippers who’d visited his church. I hope he was strong enough to handle that and didn’t fall into sin. I will never know if I have that kind of strength because I’d rather have the wisdom to avoid testing my strength. I don’t want to find my limits!

Avoiding the “door of her house” is why I have Covenant Eyes on my computer and phone (and I highly recommend it for everyone). I’d love to be strong enough that I don’t need it, but I’d rather be wise, avoid the battle, and stay pure to the Lord and to my bride. My prayer for the week is that in whatever your struggle is, God will not only give you strength to endure but also wisdom to avoid.

“But when you are tempted, he will also provide a way out…” (1 Corinthians 10:13, NIV).


Photo by Evelyn Paris on Unsplash

Never Let Go

“Hold on to instruction, do not let it go; guard it well, for it is your life.” (Proverbs 4:13, NIV).

As I sat down to read through Proverbs 4, I asked the Lord, “What do You have for me in this chapter this morning?” He replied directly (which is pretty rare for me), It’s not for you. Pray this for your sons.

I read through the chapter a couple times to get a sense for its flow and meaning and then prayed through each verse, putting in the names of Asher, Jack, Elliot, and Graham. What a beautiful prayer for my boys, and what a great lesson that God loves my children and has specific things He wants me to pray for them! Too often I get into a rut with my prayers for my family, and this was a reminder to use God’s words more often when I pray for them.

As I prayed through these verses, I noticed something I’d missed in previous readings (sometimes praying a passage brings new insight). Five times in this one chapter we’re instructed not to forget, forsake, or let go of wisdom, instruction, understanding, etc. I love to learn new things, have new experiences, go on new adventures, and explore new places. Sometimes in my passion for discovery, I get frustrated with rehashing what I “already know.”

But through directing me to pray for my boys, God also reminded me that sometimes I don’t need to learn something new, I need to hold onto what I already know. And, here’s the kicker, knowing is of no value if we don’t apply it to our lives. Maybe it’s not a fresh revelation I need; maybe I need to apply the revelation I already have received. It’s our fallen human nature to loosen our grip on God’s instruction over time, to lose our focus and stray to the right or to the left. Sometimes we need to be reminded to live according to the Word we’ve been given. My prayer for this week is that God will show you where you can you refocus your heart on His Word, and renew your commitment to live it out every day.


Photo by Robert Baker on Unsplash

The Complacency of Fools

“For the waywardness of the simple will kill them, and the complacency of fools will destroy them.” (Proverbs 1:32, NIV)

complacency, noun

  1. a feeling of quiet pleasure or security, often while unaware of some potential danger, defect, or the like; self-satisfaction or smug satisfaction with an existing situation, condition, etc.

Complacency is the realm of fools. We become complacent when we think we’re good. We think we don’t struggle with sin in a certain area. Or maybe we think we have it all figured out. Whatever the reason, we start to rest on our laurels at home, at work, or at church. Often, past success can easily turn into complacency.

But complacency is dangerous. When we’re over-confident, we’re ripe for failure. We’ve all seen the upset ball games where the underdog unexpectedly defeats a top-ranked team because they were too assured of victory. When we’re complacent, we stop depending on the Lord. We stop asking for His strength. We feel secure in our own abilities or situation while being unaware of the potential danger of sin that is crouching at our door, ready to spring.

2 Corinthians 12:9 says, “My grace is sufficient for you, for my power is made perfect in weakness.” When we acknowledge our weakness, we make room for the Lord’s power to work in us. Where am I complacent? What do I not pray about? My prayer for this week is that the Lord will show you where you’ve grown secure in your own strength, and where you just might need to rely on Him all the more.

Let the Discerning Get Guidance

“Let the wise listen and add to their learning, and let the discerning get guidance.” (Proverbs 1:5, NIV)

After finishing Leviticus, I had thought to go through Hebrews. However, as I started it, I had a distinct impression I wasn’t reading in the right place. So I stopped and asked the Lord where He wanted to connect with me, and He said, Proverbs. Honestly, I didn’t want to go to Proverbs! I told God, “Everyone reads Proverbs. Can I read something else? Can we spend this time together in something different? I’ve read Proverbs so many times–is there something else I’m less familiar with that we could do?” But God said, No time spent with Me is wasted. Go to Proverbs.

Reading through the first few verses in Proverbs felt like a weight lifting off my shoulders. I confessed to the Lord that I had wanted to read Hebrews because we’re planning to do a sermon series through Hebrews next spring, and I thought reading it now could help me prepare for the series. I felt His smile, and He said, I know. You can study for your sermon series on the clock. Off the clock, you’re Mine.

When I read Proverbs 1:5, I had to smile. After being at LakeView almost a year, I still feel like a rookie. There are so many aspects of being a lead pastor that I have yet to learn. I have been asking God for wisdom and guidance, and He directed me to this verse in Proverbs to let me know He’s going to answer my request. I love God!

My prayer for this week is that you will feel God’s smile in your life as you seek His wisdom and guidance. For true wisdom is understanding just how little we know and how much we need the Lord.


Photo by Austin Chan on Unsplash