Tell Your Son (and Daughter)

“On that day tell your son, ‘I do this because of what the Lord did for me…’” (Exodus 13:8a, NIV)


Parents have an incredible amount of influence on their kids. Many of us try to raise our kids to be Christians, but statistics show that the majority of kids raised in church walk away from their faith as young adults. While the reasons for this are many and varied, Dr. Tim Kimmel (author of my all-time favorite parenting book, Grace Based Parenting) points out in his book Why Christian Kids Rebel that many kids see their parents treating faith like a hobby, and follow their example.

There is much that has been written about church programming for youth (see this excellent and challenging article by Marc Yoder). Yet, as important as church programming is (or isn’t–the real importance of the church is not the programming), the primary responsibility to teach kids about the Lord belongs to the parents (or grandparents or legal guardians–whoever is raising the kids). We cannot hand over that responsibility and hope that their Sunday school teachers and youth leaders will do our job for us. Youth and children’s programming is supposed to supplement what kids are getting at home, not replace it. It serves as a catalyst, a resource, a conversation-starter for parents. But we have to do our job as parents, and the most important parental responsibility we have is to teach our kids about Jesus (we can’t make them choose to give their lives to Christ, but we can show them what life with Christ is all about, lead them to the point of decision, and help them follow Jesus if they choose to).

I understand it’s not easy. And, my kids are still little, so I don’t pretend to know how this works with teenagers. All I can say is this: As I was having coffee with the Lord and His Word this morning, Exodus 13:8 kept grabbing my eyes. I asked the Lord why, and in reflecting on the verse two thoughts came to my mind from my own childhood. First, my parents’ faith is genuine and important to them–definitely not a hobby. They lived a real relationship with God in front of us, and their example is still to this day the most powerful influencer of my own faith. Second, my parents never hesitated to do just what Exodus 13:8 says. They told us, “We do this because of what the Lord has done for us.” They talked to us about God in a natural way so that conversations about the Lord became a normal part of life, not some weird, dorky, or forced thing.

I am thankful for my parents. God reminded me this morning that I need to do the same with my kids. My prayer for this week is that you will be gently nudged by the Holy Spirit  to have a conversation with your kids (or grandkids): “I do this because of what the Lord has done for me…”

Childish Hearts

“Folly is bound up in the heart of a child, but the rod of discipline will drive it far away.”

Proverbs 22:15 (NIV)

If ever there was a verse that seemed outdated in today’s supposedly “progressive” society, this is it. Most parents of young children I know don’t spank their kids and consider spanking to be borderline abuse. It seems like the popular parenting strategy these days is “empower the child” to make decisions they are unable to make and become ever more entrenched in the belief that the universe really does revolve around their precious little faces.

However, this blog post isn’t about spanking, or even how we should raise our kids. When I read Pr. 22:15, God plucked a string in my soul that harmonized with several other things I’ve recently been learning–but not about parenting.

A few weeks ago I read The Emotionally Healthy Church by Peter Scazzero. His thesis in the book is “it’s impossible to be spiritually mature while remaining emotionally immature.” This is a simple, yet profound truth. God is not just interested in my (or your) spiritual growth, but in my growth and development as a whole person. If I only focus on spiritual development, yet remain emotionally immature, I become a Christian full of knowledge with the appearance of being a mature disciple, but I am prideful, petty, selfish, insecure, passive-aggressive, and filled with vain ambition. In many ways, I have only been empowered to think that I’m indispensable and the church bubble really does revolve around my precious little face. I am childish in my faith (childish faith is not the same as childlike faith, but that’s a different post).

While children can be sweet and funny, we all know how embarrassing it is to see a teenager act like a toddler. A little discipline helps our kids learn and grow, and teaches them to make wise decisions. It’s no different with us. Childish Christians abound in churches today, but our Father loves us too much to let us stay the way we are. Unfortunately, this often involves disciplining us to make us aware of the folly bound up in our childish hearts, and to help us mature not just spiritually, but emotionally, intellectually, and socially.

All of us will be disciplined at some point if we are indeed God’s children. My prayer for the week is we will learn and grow, even when it hurts.

Don’t be a Drama Queen

“Better a dry crust with peace and quiet than a house full of feasting, with strife.” (Proverbs 17:1, NIV)

Thinking back over Thanksgiving, my guess is that most of us enjoyed a house full of feasting. Turkey, stuffing, mashed potatoes, gravy, corn, green beans, pumpkin pie–you name it, we ate it! Sadly, for many the feast was accompanied with strife.

While we can all relate to a little strife in the home from time to time, Proverbs 17:1 struck a chord with me beyond just family. At some point in our lives, we’ve probably all had to deal with a relative, a neighbor, a classmate, a co-worker, or a brother/sister in Christ who was (or is), shall we say, melodramatic. Melodramatic is an adjective that means exaggerated, overly emotional, or overdramatic. And while we make every effort to treat our drama queens with love, patience, and grace, after a while the words Solomon penned in Proverbs 17 ring true.

As I was reflecting on this verse, I began to think of all the other people I know who tend to be a little melodramatic. Then God gently reminded me that I needed to examine my own heart first. Am I overly emotional, overdramatic, or easily offended? Do I exaggerate to downplay my own faults or play up the “woe is me” line? Sometimes I am, and sometimes I do. Thank God for his grace and forgiveness.

When I tend to the melodramatic, it’s usually because somewhere deep within, insecurity is rearing its ugly head, causing me to question my value, question my contribution, and be threatened by others. So, I overcompensate. I become hypercritical. I turn into a serial complainer. I exaggerate. I stir the pot. I draw attention to myself because I need you to like me and approve of me so that I can feel secure in myself.

But the truth is, I’m not secure in myself; I’m secure in Christ. And that makes all the difference.

I don’t need to perform to be accepted and loved. I just need to remember who it is that loves me, accepts me, has called me, and takes care of me. When God is your Father and he loves you with an infinite, unconditional love… that’s security–who cares about anything else? My prayer for the week is that we will all remember just how much God loves us, we’ll rest in him and leave the melodrama to someone else.


Enjoy this song by Tauren Wells, and enjoy God’s love for you!


Never Let Go

“Hold on to instruction, do not let it go; guard it well, for it is your life.” (Proverbs 4:13, NIV).

As I sat down to read through Proverbs 4, I asked the Lord, “What do You have for me in this chapter this morning?” He replied directly (which is pretty rare for me), It’s not for you. Pray this for your sons.

I read through the chapter a couple times to get a sense for its flow and meaning and then prayed through each verse, putting in the names of Asher, Jack, Elliot, and Graham. What a beautiful prayer for my boys, and what a great lesson that God loves my children and has specific things He wants me to pray for them! Too often I get into a rut with my prayers for my family, and this was a reminder to use God’s words more often when I pray for them.

As I prayed through these verses, I noticed something I’d missed in previous readings (sometimes praying a passage brings new insight). Five times in this one chapter we’re instructed not to forget, forsake, or let go of wisdom, instruction, understanding, etc. I love to learn new things, have new experiences, go on new adventures, and explore new places. Sometimes in my passion for discovery, I get frustrated with rehashing what I “already know.”

But through directing me to pray for my boys, God also reminded me that sometimes I don’t need to learn something new, I need to hold onto what I already know. And, here’s the kicker, knowing is of no value if we don’t apply it to our lives. Maybe it’s not a fresh revelation I need; maybe I need to apply the revelation I already have received. It’s our fallen human nature to loosen our grip on God’s instruction over time, to lose our focus and stray to the right or to the left. Sometimes we need to be reminded to live according to the Word we’ve been given. My prayer for this week is that God will show you where you can you refocus your heart on His Word, and renew your commitment to live it out every day.


Photo by Robert Baker on Unsplash

Light and Truth

“Send Your light and Your truth; let them lead me. Let them bring me to Your holy mountain, to Your dwelling place. Then I will come to the altar of God, to God, my greatest joy.” (Psalm 43:3-4, HCSB)

How often do I pray this? How often do I ask for God’s light and His truth to guide me in the decisions I make day in and day out? I’ve found that when I’m faced with a large, life-changing decision (like whether to move my family to a new community and take on a new role as a lead pastor) I tend to ask for wisdom more often. But in those in-between-years, when life seems manageable and there are no world-altering decisions staring me in the face, my tendency is to run with my own ideas, thoughts, and plans without asking for light and truth from God first.

And, even when I do ask for wisdom from God, do I seek it? Do I ask God to just download light and truth into my brain like an app update, or do I ask God for guidance as I seek His light and His truth in His Word? Sometimes we ask God to speak or give us direction and wonder why He doesn’t answer when in reality, He put that wisdom just in front of us if we’ll look for it. Have your kids ever asked you for something, and you put it just out of their reach, so they’ll have to work to get it? Why do you do you that? Because when they work to get what you have given, it’s more meaningful; and sometimes it sticks more than if you just hand it to them.

God has given us tools to seek His wisdom. He has given us His Word. He has given us the ability to reason and think rationally. He allows us to have experiences that shape us and should teach us more about life. And, most importantly, He has given us His Holy Spirit who will “guide you into all truth” (John 16:13). But that truth doesn’t just come as an update or a new operating system. It’s not downloaded and installed in our brains while we sleep. When we pray for light and wisdom, we need to look for God’s answer using the tools, gifts, and opportunities He’s blessed us with. And as we seek Him, He will guide us into all truth.

My prayer for us this week as that God will send His light and His truth to lead us each day, and that we will have the discernment to see and hear His voice.

 


Photo by Himesh Kumar Behera on Unsplash

Wisdom Guards the Heart

This week at LakeView Church we started a new series from the Book of Proverbs called Wisdom for the New Year. Proverbs 4:20-27 has a message written by King Solomon over 3,000 years ago—a message that is still relevant today. The Bible is filled with wisdom that will help us discover God’s design for life and live according to His plan.


Sermon delivered at LakeView Church on 1/7/2018.

Give Her Something To Eat!

They laughed at him, knowing that she was dead.  But he took her by the hand and said, “My child, get up!”  Her spirit returned, and at once she stood up. Then Jesus told them to give her something to eat (Luke 8:53-55, NIV).

I love this story of how Jesus was interrupted by a woman who’d been sick for 12 years while on His way to heal a very sick little 12-year-old girl (I’ve always thought it interesting that the girl’s age was the same amount of time the woman had been sick–12 years, but it’s probably just a coincidence).  The interruption delayed Jesus long enough that the little girl actually died.  Undeterred, Jesus went and raised her from the dead.

Wait… He did what?!?  Yes, He raised her from the dead!  Wow!  What an amazing miracle!  And then after performing one of the most incredible, miraculous acts in human history… He told them to fix her supper.  Jesus is so practical!  If I’d just seen my own child raised from the dead, supper would be the last thing I’d be thinking about!  But no doubt this little girl was hungry, and Jesus doesn’t just look after supernatural needs, but everyday ones, too.

This brought to my mind the question of how well do I look after my own everyday needs, like, say, sleep!  Or rest, or relaxation, or eating healthier, or… exercise (yes, I used the “e-word”).  If Jesus cares about me eating supper, maybe I should, too!  And if Jesus is concerned for the practical needs of others, so should we be.  Sometimes people don’t need a miraculous intervention, they just need a cup of coffee with a friend who will pray for them.  My prayer for us this week is that we will remember to eat, sleep, and wrestle with our kids, do the everyday, practical things that Jesus cares about, and have a very normal, “mundane” conversation with someone who just needs a friend.

In Christ,
Pastor Andy

Ezra: Heart, Head, Hands

What is the foundation of your life?  And what do we want to be the foundation of the life and ministry of LakeView Church?  Laying the proper foundation is a critical element of building anything, whether a home, a family, a life or a ministry.  I had the privilege of delivering this message at LakeView Church on September 10, 2017.

How to Cultivate Contentment

The average American throws away more stuff in a year than most of the rest of the people in the world will own in their entire lifetime. Yet, we don’t feel like we have enough. In this message, we take a biblical perspective on contentment and examine five ways to cultivate contentment. Those five ways are:

1. Count your blessings.

2. Stop comparing and start celebrating.

3. Tell yourself no. Tell God yes.

4. Trust God because he is good.

5. Be satisfied with Jesus.

Six Reasons Why It’s Important to Worship Together


And Jesus answered him, “It is written, “ ‘You shall worship the Lord your God, and him only shall you serve.’ ”

~ Luke 4:8

“The church service is the most important, momentous and majestic thing which can possibly take place on earth…”

~ Karl Barth

There is no higher calling, no greater pursuit in life than worship.  Yet, according to a recent study by the Barna Group, the average “active” church member attends church 1.7 times a month… that’s not even half the time!  And those are the “active” members!  There are some legitimately good reasons for a person to occasionally miss church, but the reality is many Christians simply fail to make worship a priority–we’re just too busy to be bothered with going to church (thankfully, Jesus wasn’t too busy to be bothered with going to the cross!).  So, as a little incentive at the start of a new year, here are six reasons why it’s important to worship together, in church, as the church.

1. It’s important to worship together because we’re commanded to.

Many times the Scriptures call us to come together to worship the Lord.  Consider Psalm 95, which begins, “Come, let us sing for joy…”  Everything in the entire Psalm is written in the plural.  In fact, it’s impossible to practice Psalm 95 by yourself, because Psalm 95 calls God’s people to gather together and worship Him.  So, we have a simple choice.  Either we will choose to be obedient to God’s Word, and make worshiping together a priority; or we will choose to be disobedient to God’s Word and skip church.  Which way will you choose?

2. It’s important to worship together because it drives our beliefs down deep into our souls.

I’ve had many conversations with people who tell me they don’t think Christianity has any real impact in their lives.  They don’t sense God’s presence with them ever, and they don’t have any connection to the power of God in their daily lives.  I wonder if this might be because their beliefs are little more than ideas in their heads?  See, beliefs don’t really change your life until they drop from your head to your heart.  It’s not enough to simply think things, you need to hold those beliefs in the depths of your soul.  And, corporate worship is designed to engage your entire being–heart, soul, mind, and strength.  When we sing our beliefs, pray our beliefs, study our beliefs, discuss our beliefs, and interact with other Christians who share our beliefs, those beliefs become more than just ideas in our heads.  They become life-transforming truths driven deeply into our souls and expressed daily in how we live.

3. It’s important to worship together because you can’t truly know God as He is by yourself.

I’ve talked with many, many people who say, “I don’t have to go to church to know God.”  The fact is, they’re wrong.  God is not just your God or my God–He is our God.  Through my study, and my experience, and my relationship with God, I have a different knowledge of Him than you do.  And you have experienced God in ways I haven’t.  If I want to truly know God as He is, I need to be with other Christians and learn from their stories, their worship, and their experiences.  When I hear sermons from other pastors, I learn more about God than I would just by studying those verses by myself.  When I hear other Christians pray, I see what God means to them and how He’s worked in their lives, and I get a bigger picture of God than I ever would have just praying by myself.  On my own, I have one tiny perspective on God–a drop in the ocean.  If I truly desire to know more of God, I must be together with other Christians in worship.

“You will never know God as He is unless you are in a worshiping community.”

~ Tim Keller, Pastor of Redeemer Presbyterian Church in New York City

4. It’s important to worship together because it’s where life together begins.

There’s no such thing as a Lone Ranger Christian.  The Christian faith is personal, but it is never private.  We do not have a private faith!  Everywhere the gospel went, it formed Christian congregations, churches, where Christians would gather.  The Christian life is a life together, and that life together begins with worship.

“The whole common life of the Christian fellowship oscillates between Word and Sacrament, it begins and ends in worship.”

~ Dietrich Bonhoeffer

5. It’s important to worship together because it reminds us what’s really important in life.

Guess what?  Your kids’ sports are not really what’s important in life.  How much money you make isn’t really the ultimate value of life.  Sleeping in doesn’t rank super high on the list of what matters most in this world.  What is really important in life is knowing God, hearing His voice and responding to it in worship.  We were created to “glorify God and to enjoy Him forever,” as the Westminster Shorter Catechism says.  When we make going to church to worship together a priority, we proclaim to ourselves, our kids, our friends, and the world around us that we are not the center of the Universe–God is.

When I was a kid, we were not allowed to play sports that caused us to miss church.  If there was a game Sunday afternoon and we could play after church, that was fine.  But we didn’t miss church to play ball because how many points you score on the field isn’t really what’s important in life.  And let’s be honest, I wasn’t going to be a professional athlete (and neither will your kids).  I can’t remember a single Sunday when we woke up, sat around in our PJ’s and asked, “Do you think we should go to church this morning?”  Was it Sunday?  Were we breathing?  Then we were going to worship God.  When I was old enough to have a job, my dad told me I wasn’t allowed to work on Sunday mornings and skip church.  My high school job wasn’t important enough to take me away from the worship of God!

Parents, when you allow your kids to skip church because of sports, working at McDonald’s, and just being too tired to get up, you are teaching them that God is only worthy of our worship when it’s convenient for us.  If you allow your kids to be the center of your family’s Universe, they will grow up thinking the world revolves around them.  But, your kids are not awesome… God is awesome.  They are not the center of the Universe–God is.  Making church a priority reminds us and teaches others around us of what’s really important in life, namely, God.

6. It’s important to worship together because we need to “rest” in Christ.

In the Old Testament, the people of Israel observed the Sabbath Day.  Every Saturday, they stopped what they normally did the rest of the week and physically rested.  They stopped their work and worshiped God.  They acknowledged that God was truly the One who provided for them, cared for them, and worked for them.  As Christians, we are not bound by the Sabbath law, like the Israelites were.  However, through Jesus Christ’s work on the cross, He offers us a spiritual Sabbath.  We don’t celebrate our “Sabbath” on Saturday, but we “rest” in Christ on Sunday, the Lord’s Day, the day when Jesus rose again.  And, we need that spiritual rest.

An aircraft carrier carries planes across the ocean.  Those planes fly out on their mission, but they can’t stay out forever.  If they don’t come back to land on the carrier, they will run out of fuel and crash.  They need to come back, be refueled, refitted, repaired, and relaunched to accomplish their mission.  That’s exactly what worship does for us.  You are out there Monday through Saturday, trying to live a godly life in a godless society.  If you stay out too long, you’ll run out of fuel and crash.  You need to stop, come back and rest in God’s sanctuary, and be refreshed.  You need to be reminded of what’s most important in life.  You need to be refocused on God’s Word, and you need to be encouraged by other Christians.  Then you need to be relaunched back into the world, full of the Spirit and ready to accomplish God’s mission for you.

Going to church on a Sunday morning is important.  It’s not just some meaningless activity Christians do, but it’s a vital part of your life as a believer.  We need to worship together, and God is worthy of our worship.  He gave His one and only Son to die on the cross in our place.  He forgives all our sin.  He provides for all our needs.  The least we can do is give Him a couple hours one day a week!