One Generation to Another

“One generation commends your works to another; they tell of your mighty acts.” (Psalm 145:4, NIV)


In my last devotional, I wrote about how God had reminded me that in the busyness of life, I need to remember to share my faith in Jesus with my kids. My goal with these Monday devotionals is simply to share what God puts on my heart and says to me in the hope that it will encourage you to listen to what God is saying to you. I think more people hear from God more often than they realize, and if I can model or share how God speaks to me, perhaps it will help you learn to better recognize His still small voice in your own heart and mind. Occasionally, one of you shares with me what God is saying to you, or how He is working in your life. I love hearing those stories! Please keep them coming!

I also hoped the devotional last week would encourage parents (and grandparents) to be more proactive in teaching their own children (and grandchildren) about the Lord, and modeling a genuine faith in and relationship with Jesus for their own kids (and grandkids). I know there are many kids out there who don’t have Christian parents or grandparents. They are incredibly important. But, in our zeal to reach them, let’s not forget about the kids God has given us–they matter, too. God reminded me of the importance of investing in my own kids last Monday, and I passed it on to you because it’s what I do with these devotional emails.

That said, this week will be a little different because I want to follow up on last week’s topic. Last week was for parents. This week is for the church. For 30 years (maybe more), the prevailing thought among churches has been divide and conquer. We’ve assumed the most effective way to reach the next generation is to isolate them and create programming in which every second is designed specifically for them. But in the past few years, we’ve begun to realize the drawbacks of that model as more and more teens walk away not just from church, but from God, when they hit adulthood. And, alarmingly, a huge percentage of these young adults are not coming back to God or the church at all, even when they start having their own kids.

Some churches reacted to this by canceling all youth and children’s programming in favor of a fully family-integrated approach. I’m not convinced that’s the right approach, either. Why do we tend to run to the far end of the spectrum on almost every issue? The best way is likely not going to be at either pole, but somewhere in the middle.

The problem with an isolation approach is that you end up with a youth/children’s ministry that is siloed, separated from the rest of the church. The church isn’t a family to them. You end up with a group of kids only loosely connected with the larger church whose building they use for their programming. When the kids become adults, they often lose interest and walk away because they’re not really part of the church. And let’s be honest, our goal isn’t to pack out our programming with high attendance (no matter what age we’re aiming for, whether children’s ministry, youth ministry, Sunday worship, or senior adults). Our goal is to lead kids (really, people of all ages) in a growing relationship with Jesus that will last their lifetime.

The problem with a fully family-integrated approach is that it also ends up isolating people (not just kids). It leaves out those who don’t have a traditional nuclear family, which just happens to be the majority of our society. The very approach targeting integration ends up as just another form of isolation.

Let’s not throw the baby out with the bathwater. I think what we need to figure out is not isolation or family-integration, but rather a church family approach to reaching the next generation. My desire is to see the church become a spiritual family. I want everyone (seniors, middle-aged, young adults, teens, and children) to have a place where they belong. I want every generation to know that they have a family–whether or not their parents are Christians–they have a family that loves them, cares for them, prays for them, and is there for them. They are welcome, they belong, there is a place they can call home. The church needs to be a surrogate family for those whose earthly families don’t follow Jesus or are not safe families. I want to see teens and children be loved by seniors who aren’t their biological grandparents but are their spiritual grandparents (of course, it would be great if their biological grandparents also loved them and helped them along in their faith journey).

Psalm 145:4 isn’t just for parents teaching their own kids (although it does cover that, too). It’s also for each generation within God’s family, the church, to pass their faith on to the generations below them with love, prayer, encouragement, admonishment, teaching, and leading by example. I’m fully in favor of age-appropriate programming and church-family-integration.

Really Living

“For now we really live, since you are standing firm in the Lord” (1 Thessalonians 3:8 NIV).

In this passage of his first letter to the Thessalonians, written from Athens (see Acts 17), Paul has been explaining how he had missed the Thessalonian Christians and had been concerned for them.  After waiting as long as he could stand, he sent one of his most trusted friends, Timothy, to check in on them.  When Timothy arrived back in Athens, he found that Paul had moved on to Corinth and he went there to give his report.  When Paul heard about the Thessalonians’ standing firm in their faith, his heart was greatly encouraged.  The church was thriving!  Paul was so filled with joy that he told them it felt like now he was really living.  It’s almost as if he wrote, “I’ve been worried to death about you, but now that I hear you are well, I feel alive again!”

From the perspective of a pastor, I can relate to Paul’s joy.  Few things bring us greater joy than seeing the people in our congregations, whom we love and care for deeply, growing in their faith and being transformed by the Holy Spirit.  We know that we can do little to make this happen (see Mark 4:26-29), but when you grow we want to say with Paul, “Now we really live!”  Success for a pastor is not measured in dollars, building campaigns, or memorized mission statements.  It’s when a church member makes a sacrificial gift for the first time or when someone discovers and pursues their calling with ardor.  It’s when a congregant makes a difficult decision out of obedience to God’s Word.  It’s when someone visits a hospital to pray for a sick friend or when a congregation goes above and beyond in its generosity toward missions.  It could even be something as simple as singing with heartfelt expression in worship (I love when the church sings so loud they drown out the band).

My prayer for you this week is that you, like the Thessalonians, would stand firm in your faith no matter what challenges the week presents, and in so doing, would fill my heart with joy so that I (or whoever your pastor is) can say with Paul, “Now I am really living!”

Nehemiah: Prayer & Action

My desire as a new Lead Pastor is to build a ministry on a strong foundation.  Nehemiah is a great example of a builder in the OT who laid a foundation of both prayer and action.  I hope this message inspires you in some way to build your life, your family, and your ministry on the foundation of seeking God’s will and then acting on it!

Going To Work With Dad

And he said: “Truly I tell you, unless you change and become like little children, you will never enter the kingdom of heaven. Therefore, whoever takes the lowly position of this child is the greatest in the kingdom of heaven” (Matthew 18:3-4).

Yesterday was my last day at Pontiac Bible Church.  Many people shared encouraging words of affirmation with us, and we walked away with a new appreciation for how God works.  God chose to include us in his plan to minister to people at PBC—what a privilege!  Yes, we endeavored to serve faithfully where he called us for the past six years, but God did all the heavy lifting.  It was good timing as I read these words of Jesus in Matthew’s Gospel this morning.  Almost as if God was reminding me, “Don’t start thinking you’re a hot shot because of all that’s happened in recent months.  Remember the path to greatness.”

My prayer this week is that we will remember in our leadership roles that we are accompanying God on his ministry.  We should be faithful in our service, but it is God who will accomplish the task.  It’s kind of like going-to-work-with-Dad-day every day!

Greater Than John

“Truly I tell you, among those born of women there has not risen anyone greater than John the Baptist; yet whoever is least in the kingdom of heaven is greater than he” (Matthew 11:11, NIV).

If belonging to the Kingdom puts us in spiritual leadership positions on par (or even greater, as Jesus says) with men like John the Baptist, then I’d say we’re in good company!  But let’s be humble (like John was) and remember that we still have much work to do, and that we need the Spirit of God to empower and enable us to do it.  That brings to mind Hebrews 12:1-2a:

Therefore, since we are surrounded by such a great cloud of witnesses, let us throw off everything that hinders and the sin that so easily entangles. And let us run with perseverance the race marked out for us, fixing our eyes on Jesus, the pioneer and perfecter of faith.

Prayer for this week: that we follow in the footsteps of great spiritual leaders in the Church while keeping our eyes on Christ, so that we may be filled with the Spirit to accomplish our calling.

Engaging Worship Services

There have been so many blogs, books, and articles, written about worship style that I could probably read one a day for the rest of my life and still not read them all!  Yet, I’m writing one more… go figure!  When it comes to corporate worship, I believe that the megachurch craze has hurt the church in America.  Megachurches have created unrealistic expectations for both quality and style, and because Christians so often have absolutely zero creativity of their own, many, many, many, many, many smaller churches (in smaller communities) have tried to copycat megachurch music… with varying levels of success failure.  In this blog, I want to consider just one question: how do we create engaging worship services?

First, I think we need to understand the primary goal of a worship service is to “ascribe to the LORD the glory due his name” (Psalm 29:2a).  The ultimate goal of worship is not to make seekers comfortable, evangelize the lost, reach a new segment of your population, or make people feel sentimental.  Not one of those things is bad, in and of itself; but not one of those things is the primary goal of corporate worship.  Worship is first and foremost about giving glory to God.  Once we understand that, we can move into the waters of seeker sensitive, evangelistic, traditional, contemporary, charismatic, emergent, EPIC, ancient-modern, etc, etc, etc, etc, with a clear head.

If the primary goal of a worship service is for the people who are present to ascribe to God the glory due him, then I think the first question we need to ask in planning a service is, who are the people present?  If your service is a youth service of primarily teens, the type of music and service flow that will engage them in ascribing glory to God may be vastly different than if you’re doing a service at a local nursing home.  Or, if your congregation is mostly blue-collar working class people in a small Midwestern town, you’ll probably find that the type of service they most deeply connect with will be different than a wealthy, professional congregation in a major city like New York.   Likewise, there are similar differences in charismatic vs. non-charismatic churches, ethnically-diverse vs. all-white churches, urban vs. suburban vs. rural churches, etc.

So now you’re already beginning to see the problem of copycatting what a mostly-white, highly-educated, upper-class, suburban megachurch does on Sunday morning.  Their context may be very different from yours (or mine), and therefore your worship service may need to be different in order to more effectively engage your congregation in ascribing to the Lord the glory due his name.

The second question to ask in order to plan an engaging worship service is, who has God given to the church?  God gives people as gifts to a local congregation (see Ephesians 4:11-12).  How has God gifted your congregation?  I do believe that we are called to develop the gifting within the church, but you have to start somewhere.  If God hasn’t given your church any drummers, bass players, or electric guitarists, should you be trying to start a Christian rock band in your worship service?  I believe God equips you to carry out his calling.  If God is calling your church to start a hip-hop worship service, then God will give you hip-hop artists who want to serve your church in that way.  If he hasn’t given your church those artists, then perhaps that’s not the direction he’s calling you to head.

The third question for planning an engaging service is, how can I use the artists God has given us to engage the people who are present in ascribing glory to God?  This is really the heart of the issue at hand, and, it requires deep thought, many conversations, trial and error, and… prayer.  Lots of prayer.  If your church is in a small farm-town in rural Missouri, all white in a town that is 97% white, mostly middle-aged and over because there aren’t a ton of young families in the area; and if God has blessed you with a keyboardist and a couple of guitar players, and a teenager who’s learning to play drum set… then trying to start a hip-hop service, or put together a Christian-radio-pop service, or build an orchestra to play the hymns of Bach probably won’t work well.  You’re not going to engage the people who are there, or use the artists God has given you to work with.

As you wrestle with this third question, here’s what I’ve discovered in over 20 years of worship arts ministry.

Quality + Authenticity > Style

I’ve found that it doesn’t really matter that you’re singing the newest song from Crowder’s American Prodigal album… if your band stinks.  If God hasn’t given you the musicians to play Christian pop-worship with good quality, then either seek a different expression of worship or wait to pull out the Christian pop until you have developed the teen drummer to keep a steady beat.  Here’s a secret: just because Elevation Church is doing it, doesn’t mean your church has to do it!  Quality is critical to engaging people in worship.  So, stop trying to be Willow Creek, Harvest Bible Chapel, Northpoint, or Elevation Church.  Be who YOU are, worship with who God has given you, and strive for excellence.  If that means you need to sing older music in order to sing it well, then by all means, sing older music well.

Quality is important.  So is authenticity.  It doesn’t matter that you’re singing Oceans (again) if your congregation isn’t genuinely worshiping.  I’ve been in churches where the band was better than the radio version, but no one was singing!  It was a performance, a show.  The congregation just didn’t engage.  Finding what engages the hearts of your church involves a lot of trial and error.  I grew up in a Pentecostal church.  Planning 35-40 minutes of “open worship” where people could “enter into the throne room of God” and “soak in the presence of the Spirit” worked great in my Pentecostal church.  But, when I took a worship pastor position in a non-charismatic church, I couldn’t figure out why the 35-minute unbroken praise fell flat.  It’s because the people in that church hadn’t learned to enter into or express worship in that way.  The style, flow, and lyrics that they most authentically worshiped with were different than in the church where I grew up.

Unfortunately, megachurches have (imho) created an unrealistic expectation for what Christian worship services are supposed to be.  The seeker-sensitive movement hijacked worship for the glory of God and turned it into a sales-pitch to convince a seeker to buy into this whole Christianity thingy.  But, I think there is hope on the horizon for normal (read, not mega-) churches to consider who, where, and when they are; to consider the artists God has given them to work with; and creatively lead a congregation in authentic worship with excellence.

Whatever you plan for your worship services, remember this: God deserves our best; and God deserves our hearts.  When you have excellence and authenticity, your worship services will not only ascribe glory to the Lord, but they will be engaging for unbelievers who visit your services.  There are few things in this world as effective for evangelism as the sincere worship of God’s people (regardless of the style).

Six Lessons from a Missionary Church

Do you see yourself as a missionary?  Or do you think of a missionary as someone who travels to a foreign country and engages in some sort of full-time ministry as a career?  While we commend, pray for, and encourage people who are called to minister overseas, we also need to recognize that to be a Christian is to be a missionary–if you belong to Christ you are sent as one of his missionaries to your corner of the world.  In this message I was honored to deliver to Pontiac Bible Church, we cover six lessons from a missionary church and how they apply to our lives both personally and collectively.  I hope you are challenged by this Scripture as much as I was when studying it!

The six lessons:

  1. A missionary church is naturally evangelistic.
  2. A missionary church is intentionally cross-cultural.
  3. A missionary church is empowered by the Holy Spirit.
  4. A missionary church has godly leaders.
  5. A missionary church practices what it preaches.
  6. A missionary church is a ministry church.

Photo by Barry J. Beitzel. Copyright 2014 Faithlife.